Excerpts from coming article in New Mobility magazine from another happy Redman client.

Why did you decide to get a standing/lifting wheelchair and when did you get it?

I picked a chair in 2003 that I thought would get around good inside and outside, without sidewalks. I didn’t fully appreciate the standing feature the first year. I had a hard time with my blood pressure and would pass out before I got all the way up. But because I have the opportunity to stand frequently I now stand long periods of time.

Why did you choose the Redman stand-up chair?

Sam Redman brought the chair to Craig Hospital and let me try it out, I liked the looks and performance. The hospital pressure mapped the chair it proved to be exemplary.

What are some of the functions of the chair, besides being able to stand?

I can do a combination of seating positions, legs partially up with small amount of recline and partial stand (blended stand), or legs straight out and full recline (a horizontal position). It also allows me to stand and recline to a bending backwards position (yoga).

How has it benefited you or not benefited you? Has it improved your quality of life, if so, how?

Sometimes people in wheelchairs are ignored. I find when I stand with everyone else I am more included in the conversation. The chair is very dependable, one thing I don’t have to worry about, I’m comfortable rolling around on my own.

What are the pros and cons of the chair?

I guess the pros are listed above. Also I haven’t had any skin issues probably because I changes positions a lot, I like to stand up, and use a blended stand. You get on a steep enough hillside it will tip over, did that, no damage to chair or me. Just had to wait for someone to set me up.

How does the chair handle on different terrains, i.e., gravel, grass, cracks in sidewalks, hills, bumps, etc? Can it move while standing?

Sledding 016It can move while standing. My neighbor got a kick out of watching me chase my horses through sagebrush to get them back home (seated, and strapped in good). Is it easy to get into? Can all types of disabilities use it? Would someone with a high level spinal cord injury be able to get into it easily and operate it?

I’m a C3 complete and I don’t transfer independently. My wife transfers me with a slide board. I use a sip and puff to control the chair.

Do you use it all the time? Where do you go in it?

Usually every day. I have 1000 miles on it now. After rehab I’ll stay in town and either go downtown or to a park, just have to let the wife know where I’ll be so she can pick me up after work.

Does insurance cover it? How was the purchasing process?

Private insurance paid for my first one. After that Medicare covered 80%. Also, I had a trade-in allowance. Redman handled all of the purchasing process.

Would you recommend this chair? What would you tell someone who is on the fence about getting one?

Yes, I would and do recommend the Redman chair. I encourage getting a standing wheelchair, one that’s easy to work on, with a good support team (have that with Redman). Looking forward to getting my third Redman power chair, in the past I have checked out other wheelchairs, best choice still Redman.

Anything else you want to add?

I feel more a part of the congregation when I can stand for song and prayer.

Leave a Reply