Are Motorized Wheelchairs Covered by Insurance?

Are Motorized Wheelchairs Covered by Insurance?

Yes, motorized wheelchairs are covered by insurance. While each person’s situation is different, there are many cases were an insurance provider will cover the cost of motorized or power wheelchair.

Many wheelchair companies quote standing wheelchairs as experimental, saying the standing function is not a covered benefit. While it may take some time to work with the insurance companies, rest assured that you can obtain a motorized, standing wheelchair through your insurance provider.

Redman Power Chair has an in-house insurance department that coordinates with your benefits to get your provider to purchase your very own power wheelchair.

When you contact our team, well start the process immediately. First we will pre-qualify you by several factors, such as diagnosis, level of mobility and insurance coverage. Next, your personal Redman insurance representative will get your insurance to approve payment, and then we’ll collect payment directly from your insurance provider. After that, you will be on your way to reclaiming your mobility with a brand new power wheelchair.

Rest assured that the insurance team at Redman is one of the most qualified and experienced in the country. The owner and founder of Redman Power Chair actually helped write the first standards for insurance billing of standing power wheelchairs. Therefore, Redman knows how to get insurance to cover this cost.

We do not give up, and neither should you! It’s unfortunate, but frequent, that client’s have medical needs that are not met. Often times they are provided with an inappropriate piece of equipment that does not provide the right benefits to the user.

This is not the case with Redman. If the chair is an appropriate fit for your needs, you can be confident that our insurance specialists will work efficiently and diligently on your behalf.

Call Redman Power Chair at 1-800-727-6684 to get the process started. Your mobility is only one call away.

The Best Power Wheelchair for Multiple Sclerosis

For those who have been diagnosed with Multiple sclerosis (MS), decisions about assistive technology can have a massive impact on their quality of life while managing the disease.

MS is an auto-immune disorder affecting the central nervous system.

 

MS affects neurons, which are the cells of the brain and spinal cord that transport information and allow the brain to control the body. With MS, the body’s neurons become damaged leading to degenerative symptoms related to muscle control and sensory function.

 

The disease is chronic and progressive, and currently there is no cure. However, many treatments and interventions help those diagnosed with MS to manage their symptoms and slow the progression of the disorder.

 

Once MS progresses motor function and balance become impaired. In these cases, a motorized wheelchair is very effective for maintaining mobility, independence, and optimizing health.

 

When is it Time to Use an Electric Wheelchair for MS?

MS is notoriously difficult to predict when it comes to individual symptoms and prognosis. A wide variety of symptoms and presentations makes MS a unique disorder to deal with. Overall, however, patterns of progression with the disease lead to deficits in particular areas.

 

For instance, multiple sclerosis symptoms often include the loss of muscle control, vision, balance, and sensation. There are four different types of MS, and, depending on which type, you may be more or less likely to need a wheelchair. To better understand the 4 types of MS and which ones warrant wheelchair use, we discuss each type below.

The 4 Types of Multiple Sclerosis

  • Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS). This is the most common form of multiple sclerosis. Of note, about 85% of people with MS are initially diagnosed with RRMS. People with RRMS have temporary periods called relapses, flare-ups or exacerbations when new symptoms appear. Usually, individuals reach secondary-progressive MS before they may require the use of a wheelchair.
  • Secondary-Progressive MS (SPMS). In SPMS, symptoms worsen more steadily over time, with or without the occurrence of relapses and remissions. Most people who are diagnosed with RRMS will transition to SPMS at some point. During the course of SPMS, many people do require the use of a wheelchair due to motor impairment.
  • Primary-Progressive MS (PPMS). This type of MS is not very common as only roughly 10% of people with MS are diagnosed with PPMS. This MS type is characterized by slowly worsening symptoms from the beginning, with no relapses or remissions. Many individuals diagnosed with PPMS require the use of a power wheelchair during the course of the illness.
  • Progressive-Relapsing MS (PRMS). This is the rarest form of MS affecting an estimated 5% of people with MS. PRMS is characterized by a steadily worsening disease state from the beginning, with acute relapses but no remissions, with or without recovery. It is again common to use a wheelchair once muscle function has declined with this type of MS.

More on Wheelchair Use and MS

MS primarily first affects people in their early to middle adulthood and is more commonly found in women than men. Because of the different types of multiple sclerosis and variable progression of the disease, an individual may require the use of mobility aids.

Wheelchair for Multiple Sclerosis

Whether aids like a cane, walker, leg brace, manual wheelchair, or a mobility scooter are required, people typically use what is needed to overcome the progressive loss associated with the disease.

 

That includes upgrading to the use of power mobility to complete activities of daily living such as cooking, cleaning, grooming, reaching, and standing. Plus, power wheelchairs empower people to get around whether to continue professional activities or other kinds of errands.

 

In addition, some such patients may use a manual wheelchair for part of the day, but due to fatigue, they may benefit from the use of a motorized wheelchair at different times.

Choosing the Best Wheelchair for Multiple Sclerosis

If you or someone you care about have multiple sclerosis, Redman Power Chair offers the best motorized standing wheelchair available to maintain independence and functioning. What is unique about the Redman Power Chair is the ability to automatically stand up with the power chair’s assistance.

 

The Redman Power Chair is ideal for MS patients who have trouble standing unassisted. Additionally, the latest Redman model, the Chief 107-ZRx is the most advanced power chair on the market. That’s because the 107-ZRx can move and rest at any position between sitting, standing, and reclining.

 

For example, if you want to horizontally align your legs while doing a 45-degree backrest slant, or stretch your torso upward and move anywhere between sitting and standing, you can. The support and flexibility of the Redman chair is the best way to obtain optimum health benefits to your body and mind when psychomotor impairments get worse.

The Redman Power Chair for MS Patients

As symptoms of multiple sclerosis progress, you or a loved one with MS will likely benefit most from an electric wheelchair with maximum mobility capabilities. The Redman Power Chair uses power tilt, recline, stand, and rotate technology to help you move your body into the position you prefer automatically.

 

Besides the practical benefits of standing, reaching, and moving with intuitive controls, users benefit from the psychological boost that standing eye-to-eye with others in social situations yields. A wealth of research has lauded the physical and phycological benefits of standing daily for wheelchair-bound individuals.

 

The human body is meant to stand, so when standing is not possible due to MS, many negative symptoms start to compound. However, when such individuals use assistive technology, they reap many benefits including better circulation, breathing, bladder and bowel function, muscle flexibility and strength, bone density, and pressure relief, among others.

Take Back Control with the Redman Power Chair

Multiple sclerosis is a distressing disease that takes over the life of many people. When symptoms progress to disabling levels, it can feel like extremely upsetting and even hopeless at times.

 

But with the best technology available you don’t have to give up your ability stand, get around, and stretch independently. Regain your freedom and independence with the most advanced power wheelchair available.

 

Give the friendly qualified team a call at Redman Power Chair today. We work with most insurances directly to help you get the assistive mobility technology for the most affordable prices.

 

The Redman Power Chair is the perfect solution for MS patients when mobility impairments get in the way of fully functioning independently. Give us a call today at 1-800-727-6684, and take back control of your life with the best Wheelchair for Multiple Sclerosis!

Can I Exercise In a Motorized Wheelchair?

Exercise In a Motorized Wheelchair

Can I Exercise In a Motorized Wheelchair?

Yes, you can exercise in a motorized wheelchair through specifically designed programs focused on stretching and strength building.

Today, many people who are confined to wheelchairs think they will never have the ability to exercise or be able to perform simple stretches. This is no longer the case thanks to the Redman Power Chair.Our motorized wheelchair can stretch and exercise your body, using a process we call Chairapy Wheelchair Yoga.

The Chief 107-ZRX, our unique model of power wheelchair, makes it possible for users to exercise like never before.This model by Redman Power Chair allows you to move into multiple positions such as lying flat, sitting down, or even standing upright. Doing so creates movements similar to various yoga positions, while also gaining many related health benefits.In addition, Chairapy Yoga enhances your physical and mental wellbeing by positioning your body in any position desired, allowing stretching and flexing of various muscle groups.

What kind of exercise can you do in a wheelchair?

There are various forms of exercise you can do in a wheelchair.Before you start, consult a physician or physical therapist to make sure that the exercises you do will not cause any pain or damage.The main form of exercise accessible to wheelchair users is muscle stretching. You can stretch your arms, shoulders, back, and even your legs. These stretches, such as the Head Tilt, the Shoulder Shrug or Palms Up can help relieve tension and stiffness all over the body (OSUMC, 2019)[1].

If you use a standing wheelchair, such as the Redman Power Chair, you may be able to benefit from other, more extensive forms of exercise.Changing the bodies position from sitting to standing, or even lying flat, can open up lower body movements and put less pressure on your joints.

Why should you exercise in your wheelchair?

You should exercise in your wheelchair because exercise has been proven to improve health conditions, prevent disease, boost energy and improve overall mood (Mayo, 2019)[2]. The Redman Power Chair goes a step further and allows for a more natural movement that is safe and comfortable for the user.

Moreover then maneuverability options, it also decreases the likelihood of skin damage when changing positions.While your movement may be limited, a power wheelchair can help you get back your freedom as well as your health.Look for our new video on how to use the Redman Power Chair to move and exercise like you have never been able to before

.If you do not already own a Redman Power Chair and would like to learn more, contact us today to schedule a free demo of our reclining, standing and relaxing power wheelchair.You can also contact us for more information about insurance coverage, funding and finance options, and frequently asked questions.

Gain your mobility back today and reach out to learn about all the opportunities provided by the Redman Power Chair. You will be glad that you did.

References & Citations

1. https://patienteducation.osumc.edu/Documents/wheelstretch.pdf
2. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389

 

Different Types of Wheelchairs

Since the first commercially produced wheelchairs, there have been countless different kinds of wheelchairs designed and manufactured especially over the last half-century. Everything from simple, manual wheelchairs to electric standing, tilting, and reclining power wheelchairs­–we have compiled all the different kinds of chairs available here.

 

All the wheelchairs included on our list are not every possible kind of chair out there. However, this is a fairly comprehensive list. We discuss the different types of wheelchairs, their functions, and the pros and cons of each. Browse through the different wheelchair types and learn more about the possibilities for you or a loved one looking the right assistive technology.

Manual Wheelchairs

Manual wheelchairs are wheeled chairs that are powered by the use of the user’s hands. By grabbing the handling around the wheels, the user propels the chair forward, backward, and pivots as well. In addition, manual wheelchairs can be pushed by someone else standing behind the wheelchair user. For this reason, manual chairs have handles located behind the backrest.

 

There are Different Types of Wheelchairs that are manual chairs to emphasize different uses. For example, lightweight and foldable chairs are often convenient for placing into a smaller vehicle when moving from a chair and into a vehicle. Alternately, heavy-duty chairs are useful for holding more weight and are typically more durable.

Manual wheelchairs are great for people who can operate them independently. However, the downside is that users can quickly become fatigued especially if they are traveled long distances or moving around for an extended period of time on their own. Additionally, constant use of manual wheelchairs can lead to health problems if the user never spends time in a standing position.

Powered Wheelchairs

Power wheelchairs are electric, battery-operated wheelchairs that propel the user forward by use of controls. A motorized wheelchair like this resolves the issue of fatigue as well as disabilities that restrict the use of manually operated wheelchairs. Users of powered chairs can go further without tiring and gain more independence when operating a manual chair is difficult or impossible.

Different Types of Wheelchairs

Some of the downsides to powered wheelchairs is that they are heavier and bulkier than manual chairs. This comes with the territory since powered chairs need to include a battery and motor at a minimum for mobility. There are many types of powered wheelchairs. The most basic power chairs offer the user the ability to drive around and they are typically operated with hand steering and controls. However, powered wheelchairs are just one of Different Types of Wheelchairs available.

Pediatric Wheelchairs

Pediatric wheelchairs are specifically designed for use by children. This category includes other kinds of chairs like manual, powered, and specialized wheelchairs–except all are built for kid-sized users. Some specialized pediatric wheelchairs are designed to accommodate specific mobility disorders to help children have independence with assistive technology.

 

For pediatric wheelchairs, the goal is for children to quickly adjust to using their chair and feel comfortable using it. Plus, as much as possible pediatric wheelchairs should be designed and styled in the way the child likes. Fun and decked-out pediatric wheelchairs can help the child’s confidence when interacting with peers

Positioning Wheelchairs

Positioning wheelchairs offer the user the ability to maneuver into different positions on their wheelchair. Typically, these chairs are electric and battery-powered for both mobility as well as positioning. There is a variety of positioning wheelchair types and styles.

 

For example, some positioning wheelchairs recline backward. Other wheelchairs can raise and lower the user’s feet and legs. Still other types allow the user to tilt in space automatically. Some chairs offer every kind of movement capability while others are only able to do one kind of positioning. Just a few options available in a large variety of Different Types of Wheelchairs.

 

Many health benefits can be gained by using a positioning wheelchair to move the user’s body into different positions. Reclining and adjusting leg positioning, for example, helps the individual to have better circulation and avoid detriments like ulcers, sores, and wounds. Plus, these can help people with movement impairments do more independently.

 

Sports Wheelchairs

Sports wheelchairs come in different shapes and sizes and most are manual wheelchairs. There are specifically designed chairs for basketball, tennis, racing, and even rugby. Opportunities for wheelchair-bound people have increased greatly with the technological advancements of sports wheelchairs and the implementation of wheelchair sport itself.

 

The standard sports wheelchair for basketball features a slanted outward wheel design. This helps the athlete to better maintain balance while offering more space for upper body movement. Most chairs of this sort include four smaller wheels beneath the two large main wheels for better stability. Sports wheelchairs also offer protection for the athlete’s legs to avoid injuries on the court.

All-Terrain Wheelchairs

All-terrain wheelchairs come in many different styles and shapes, with varying potential for travel. You may be amazed by the size and power of some of these vehicles. All-terrain wheelchairs use technology like larger wheels and extended designs to maintain balance while traversing uneven ground.

 

Some designs even use tank treads to plow over obstacles. Extra suspension support and balloon-style wheels give users another edge to cruise outdoors at will. Such wheelchairs are usually heavy-duty and difficult transport, but the upside is the opportunity to go where many other wheelchairs cannot!

Standing Power Wheelchairs

Standing power wheelchairs are some of the most impressive technological machines modern science has created. These chairs offer the user the ability to automatically–and safely–move from a sitting position into a standing one. In addition, power standing wheelchairs let the user navigate the world with the motorized wheel base.

 

Electric standing wheelchairs promise even more health benefits to users with mobility impairments. The human body was designed to stand, so when people are unable to move into a standing position their health suffers! Power standing chairs offer the unique ability for the user to move conveniently into a standing position with the motorized technology.

 

Plus, users can stand at will to reach items, do chores, and to interact eye-to-eye in social settings among many other activities. Top-of-the-line power standing wheelchairs combine the abilities of other kinds of wheelchairs to give users the optimum functionality.

The Best All-Around Wheelchair Type

With so many different kinds of wheelchairs fulfilling various functions, the right chair for you is the one that best meets your individual needs. That being said, within each wheelchair type there is a range of quality and comfort. The right wheelchair will offer the assistance you need while optimizing your overall health.

 

When it comes to versatility, function, and dependability, there is only one wheelchair that offers the full range of function across wheelchair categories. That wheelchair is the Redman Power Chair. This motorized standing wheelchair is the only chair designed with the capabilities of a positioning wheelchair, standing wheelchair, all-terrain wheelchair, and even a pediatric wheelchair.

The Most Versatile Wheelchair Available

The Redman Power Chair’s latest 2019 model, the Chief 107-ZRx, has the most flexibility of any chair on the market. With this incredible wheelchair, users can recline past 180 degrees to stretch, stand, sit, tilt, and move their legs independently as well as any position in between all while being able to move on wheels at the same time.

 

Plus, users of the Redman Power Chair can traverse over obstacles with its off-road wheeled technology. Since Redman only builds one perfected power standing chair design, they have developed the best-rated wheelchair for comfort and ability based on decades of improvements from customer feedback.

 

The Redman Power Chair is also a fantastic option for pediatric users. Redman offers an adjustable growth kit so children can use the same chair as they grow! Get the most out of your wheelchair with the power standing chair with unmatched utility. For users looking for assistive technology to travel, stand, sit, and stretch lie no other, the Redman Power Chair cannot be beaten. Contact us today to get started.

Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs

Many different kinds of disabilities require the use of wheelchairs for mobility. These are referred to as mobility impairments. Disabilities may be orthopedic (relating to the bone and muscles) or they may be neuromuscular (relating to the nerves and muscles).

 

For example, some of the more common kinds of mobility impairments are amputation, paralysis, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, and spinal cord injury. Many other impairments can lead an individual to use a motorized wheelchair to get around as well.

 

Medical conditions that require wheelchairs have a wide range of types and presentations, but finding a wheelchair that meets each person’s individual needs is very important. The right wheelchair, whether manual or electronic, sitting or standing, reclining, and tilting, will be the one that offers the best opportunities for comfort, independence, and mobility.

Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs

Spinal Cord Injuries

One of the most common Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs is spinal cord injuries. Injuries to the spinal cord lead to different types of impairment depending on the area of the spine that has been injured.

 

For example, quadriplegia means the individual has lost function of the body below the neck including the arms, legs, and body. Although some people retain limited use of hands or arms with quadriplegia, this is not always the case. Additionally, paraplegia refers to the loss of function in the lower extremities including the legs and lower body.

 

For both quadriplegia and paraplegia, motorized wheelchairs are effective for regaining mobility and independence. Additionally, standing electric wheelchairs offer many health and psychological benefits by assisting the user to move into a standing position on command.

Amputations

Amputation refers to the surgical removal of all or part of a limb or extremity such as an arm, leg, foot, hand, toe, or finger. While many different reasons may lead to needing an amputation, some of the most common causes are poor circulation, physical injury, nacreous tumor growth, infection, and frostbite. This is a common Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs.

 

Amputations involving toes, feet, and legs often result in mobility impairment. Every case is unique and there are many different solutions to help an individual maintain or regain mobility following an amputation. For example, artificial limbs are often effective for helping people stay mobile.

 

However, for many amputees, a wheelchair is essential assistive technology for maintaining mobility, independence, and functionality. Specialized wheelchairs are designed to promote comfort, movement, and health for individuals with mobility impairment and an amputation or amputations.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is one of the most common Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs, a disorders in the United States with about 800,000 people are affected. Symptoms range from mild to severe affecting the brain and motor functioning. This disorder results from brain damage occurring around childbirth.

 

Some symptoms of cerebral palsy may be limited muscle control, problems with reflexes, difficulty with coordination and control, and oral motor problems. For many people diagnosed with cerebral palsy, assistive motor devices like motorized wheelchairs are necessary.

 

Additionally, standing electric wheelchairs are especially effective for better circulation and health for those who have difficulty walking and have cerebral palsy.

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis or MS is a disease in which the body’s immune system targets its own central nervous system. This means the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves are negatively affected. MS results in many different kinds of symptoms from mild to severe. This is a common Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs.

 

For some with MS, a wheelchair is needed for mobility. Symptoms such as muscle spasms and stiffness, fatigue, walking difficulties, dizziness, tremors, and seizures may warrant the need for a motorized wheelchair or, in some cases, a power standing chair.

 

When walking and standing are not possible or very difficult with more severe multiple sclerosis, an electric wheelchair is a great tool for better independence and health.

Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a type of dementia that affects the brain–with declines in memory, thinking, and behavior. The disease is progressive and there is currently no cure, but there are treatments and interventions to help those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Some may not realize this but this is one of the Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs.

 

Age is the greatest risk factor. To illustrate, 1 in 14 people over age 65 have Alzheimer’s and 1 in 6 over the age of 80. It is less common, but some people get early-onset Alzheimer’s meaning they are diagnosed before age 65. Most people live 4-8 years after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s but may live up to 20 years.

 

Because the disease is progressive, the symptoms become worse from early to moderate to severe stages. Early stages are characterized by thinking and memory problems and in the late stage individuals often need full-time care and access to a wheelchair for mobility.

Muscular Dystrophy

Muscular dystrophy encompasses several different diseases that lead to loss of muscle and progressive weakening of the body. In this disorder, gene mutations cause problems with the production of proteins normally used to make healthy muscles. With that being said it’s clear that this is one of the Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs.

 

The most common types of muscular dystrophy occur in childhood most often with boys. Although, other types do not present until adulthood. While there is no cure for muscular dystrophy, therapy and medication can slow the progress of the disease.

 

The most common form of muscular dystrophy is Duchenne type. This type, for example, is characterized by difficulties with motor activities such as walking or sitting up, muscular stiffness and pain, and frequent falling.

 

Other types have mainly to do with which muscle groups are most affected. Oftentimes, electric wheelchairs including tilting, reclining, and standing wheelchairs are effective resources for people with muscular dystrophy depending on their specific needs.

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that impacts movement. Symptoms move from subtle and mild to more and more disruptive as motor function declines.

 

For example, a slight hand tremor may be the first sign, but further tremors, muscle rigidity, difficulties with walking and balance, speech problems, and posture difficulties are some of the symptoms that follow. Muscles on one side of the body are often affected first. Men are more likely to develop Parkinson’s and older people, usually, after age 60, are more likely to get the disorder.

 

If a wheelchair becomes necessary due to the mobility problems associated with the disease, it is recommended to use a tilting and reclining chair to help with circulation and blood pressure. Standing power chairs are also helpful for slowing the progression of Parkinson’s and maintaining better health outcomes.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) impacts nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord and is referred to as a neurodegenerative disease. ALS involves the progressive degeneration of the motor neurons that eventually leads these neurons dying. Which clearly would mean this is one of the Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs.

 

When motor neurons in the brain die, the individual loses the ability to control muscle movements across the body. Therefore, the ability to voluntarily control muscles declines over the course of the disease to the point of significant or total paralysis in later stages.

 

There are an estimated 16,000 people with ALS. The disease does not currently have a cure, but several medical treatments prolong survival and quality of life while living with ALS.

 

Depending on the progression of the disease, an electric wheelchair, especially a reclining, tilting, and standing power chair, is essential for a better quality of life and health for mobility assistance.

Scoliosis

Scoliosis involves a problematic curvature of the spine that develops most often during the accelerated growth period just before puberty. In some cases, scoliosis develops as a result of other medical conditions like muscular dystrophy or cerebral palsy, for example.

 

However, the exact cause for most scoliosis cases is unknown. It is estimated that roughly 3% of adolescents have scoliosis. While most cases of scoliosis are not debilitating, some spine deformities become progressively more severe as children and adolescents grow.

 

Scoliosis in severe forms can be disabling. For some with a diagnosis of scoliosis, a wheelchair is required for mobility and comfort.

Traumatic Brain Injury

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) results from a physical blow, jolt, or bump to the head or body causing injury to the brain. TBI can also result from an object penetrating the brain, such as a bullet or knife.

 

There is a wide range of symptoms from milder to severe depending on the extent of the trauma to the brain itself. Mild TBI affects the brain in a more temporary manner with cognitive abilities being impacted.

 

Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting, headaches, sleep complications, and disorientation. Severe TBI can result in bruising, torn tissues, bleeding and other physical damage to the brain. These injuries can result in long-term or lifelong symptoms or death.

 

Many people who suffer a traumatic brain injury experience the loss of the ability to walk or independently position themselves. As a result, some with debilitating symptomology following a TBI require the use of a specialized power wheelchair.

 

Standing, tilting, and reclining electric chairs offer superior abilities for mobility and positioning for better health and psychological outcomes.

Spina Bifida

Spina bifida is a birth defect involving complications with spine and spinal cord forming improperly. Spina Bifida occurs when the neural tube, which forms early in pregnancy, fails to develop or close properly.

 

This condition leads to defects in the spinal cord. Fortunately, in many cases, early treatment such as surgery resolves the problem completely. However, for some complications following early treatment result in severe symptoms including walking and mobility problems.

 

This occurs when the nerves used to control the leg muscles are not functioning properly. Because spina bifida occurs in the spinal cord it can impact the nervous system. Therefore, muscle weakness of the legs and sometimes paralysis of the lower body can also occur. Mobility impairment as a result of spina bifida may require the use of a manual or electric wheelchair.

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease involving the production and use of insulin in the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose from food get into your cells to give them energy. However, with type 1 diabetes, the body fails to produce insulin at all.

 

As a result, continuing medication through the use of insulin medication, glucose monitoring, and other medical interventions are necessary for managing the disease. Type 2 diabetes is the more common type which generally means the body has difficulties using its insulin correctly. Diabetes puts people at risk for further health problems.

 

For example, roughly half of individuals diagnosed with type 1 diabetes experience nerve damage, also referred to as diabetic neuropathy. In addition, many people also have foot complications related to the neuropathy which may include ulcers, poor circulation, and amputation.

 

Depending on the presentation, many people with diabetes take advantage of assistive mobility technology such as power wheelchairs for better health and mobility.

Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease. This means that the immune system essentially attacks itself in the body. With arthritis, the immune system primarily attacks the joints of the body such as the hands, fingers, wrists, back, knees, and feet. This is also one of the common Disabilities that Require Wheelchairs.

 

In some severe cases, arthritis impacts other parts of the body including organs like the heart, lungs, and kidneys. Rheumatoid arthritis is a progressive disease so symptoms become worse over time.

 

About 1.5 million people in the U.S. have rheumatoid arthritis, but there is a significant range of symptoms from very mild to quite debilitating. For example, some people may only have minor tiredness and ache and pains, and others may be entirely dependent on a wheelchair for health and mobility.

 

Motorized wheelchairs are often necessary to help with mobility, comfort, and optimum health. Standing and reclining power chairs are excellent options for those who cannot stand independently or have great difficulty doing so.

Other Causes Leading to Wheelchair Use

Many other medical conditions may warrant the use of a wheelchair. For example, cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis, epilepsy, stroke, glaucoma, hepatitis C, hypertension, lymphedema, menopause, obesity, osteoporosis, plagiocephaly, post-polio syndrome, sleep apnea, and vascular disease can all require wheelchair use.

 

Many other medical conditions can also lead to needing a wheelchair. Furthermore, many times people deal with more than one medical condition at the same time. Often, with multiple diagnoses the problem becomes even more complicated.

 

Whatever the medical condition leading to mobility impairment, electric wheelchairs are extremely valuable tools to help those with a disability. Additionally, when an individual is unable to stand on their own, a motorized standing wheelchair provides a myriad of opportunities for social, psychological, health, and professional benefit.

The Bottom Line on Wheelchair Use

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 10% of the world’s population suffers from a disability. Furthermore, of those, another 10% would benefit from access to a wheelchair. WHO also states that access to assistive mobility technology is a human right.

 

This is essential because access to wheelchairs, whether manual or automatic depending on the need allows people with disabilities to function in society. Wheelchairs allow users to work, care for themselves and others, and accomplish daily living tasks independently.

 

For those who have mobility impairments using the right chair for them makes a world of a difference. Manual, automatic, reclining, tilting, and standing wheelchairs have a huge impact on quality of life, independence, physical and psychological health for people with disabilities.

The History of Motorized Wheelchairs

The History of Motorized Wheelchairs

motorized wheelchairs

Motorized wheelchairs, also referred to as a power-electric or powerchair, are wheelchairs that are powered by an electric motor rather than by hand.

 

These powerchairs opened up a whole new realm of possibilities for people who were either physically unable to manually propel a non-powered wheelchair, or who experienced difficulties in doing so.

 

Motorized wheelchairs allowed people who used a traditional wheelchair to get around to go greater distances without fatigue and do more on their own, effectively increased autonomy and independence.

 

Powerchairs were also useful for people with cardiovascular and other conditions causing fatigue and inhibiting mobility.

Wheelchairs Across the Ages

While manually operated wheelchairs have existed for hundreds of years, it is only in about the last 100 years that the first motorized wheelchairs were first made.

 

In the early 20th century, an electrically propelled tricycle was invented in England. This first device had a crude design and stability issues with its three-wheel set-up.

 

It wasn’t until about the 1950s that commercially produced power wheelchairs were made to meet the demand after WWII. Many injured veterans were looking for solutions following immobilizing injuries.

 

These early power wheelchairs had bulky, heavy frames and were powered by lead-acid batteries. They had simple motors with drive belts and pulleys for mobility.

 

Operating these chairs was pretty crude. The powerchair had only high and low for speed choices. To steer, a joystick would engage one of four levers to give direction. The result was a jerky vehicle with poor maneuverability.

Technological Advancements

Despite the limitations of the first commercially available models, these first electric wheelchairs revolutionized life for its users.

 

For the first time in history, people who were physically unable to walk or operate a manual wheelchair could now get around unassisted.

 

These electric powered chairs paved the way for innovation, better models, and previously unimagined possibilities.

 

Not only did powerchairs become more accessible, gain vastly improved maneuverability and comfort, but they also advanced in ways that offered new potential for the user.

 

In the late ‘70s and ‘80s, several innovative companies developed the world’s first power standing wheelchairs.

 

Redman Power Chair pioneered the standing wheelchair in 1984, combining fit and function with extreme reliability to enhance the lives of satisfied customers across the U.S.

The Power Standing Wheelchair Revolution

Power standing wheelchairs raised the bar for what was possible for assistive mobility technology.

 

Since their advent and constant refinement over the following decades, power standing chairs have proved to offer unrivaled mobility access and manifold health benefits.

 

As people who are wheelchair-bound know, the ability to quickly upgrade to a standing position on your own is both refreshing and empowering.

 

In addition to the social and psychological possibilities, using assistive technology to stand has many physical health benefits that improve longevity, comfort, and bodily functionality.

Health Benefits of Assistive Standing Technology

Standing utilizing of an electric power chair has been shown in numerous peer-reviewed studies to help users improve many body functions and relieve the negative effects of sitting.

 

For example, daily standing has been definitively shown to increase and maintain bone strength and density, improve digestion, increased lung capacity, improve bladder and bowel control, improve blood pressure and circulation, and relieve pressure stress to the back and upper body muscles among others.

 

Such positive findings both reported by excited power standing chair users and documented by in scientific journals advanced advocates to fight for medical coverage to help people gain access to such valuable technology.

 

Today, Medicare and major medical insurance companies cover or help cover costs for standing power chair as a prescription medical device for qualified users. Redman Power Chair helps its clients navigate the reimbursement and payment process with healthcare providers on the user’s behalf.

Unprecedented Independence and Features

The newest standing power chairs include a vast array of functions and features. For example, the 2019 Chief 107-ZRx by Redman Power Chair is leading the industry in terms of functionality and dependability, features, and maneuverability.

 

Not only can users stand with intuitive, customizable hand-operated controls, but they can stretch, tilt, lay, sit, and stop anywhere in between. Plus, the Redman chair can be driven safely in any position.

 

This model uses six-wheel technology designed to move through off-road areas with larger wheels. In addition, the industry best compact design with 18-inch seat height, 39-inch chair length, and 23-inch chair width means users can navigate narrow spaces with ease.

 

Perhaps most importantly, the latest power standing chair model has long-lasting battery life that will last for a full day of usage before recharging overnight. Users can drive up to 15-20 miles on a single charge.

From Simplistic to Profound

Electricity-powered wheelchairs have come a long way from the crude early models just a couple of generations back. Revolutionary assistive standing technology is the cutting edge for access to the best mobility and personal freedom for wheelchair users today.

 

Informed by scientific research, user feedback, and the best engineering design, Redman Power Chair stands above the competition as the leading electric standing wheelchair in the industry.

 

Discover how Redman Power Chair can transform your way of life and improve your health. Sign up for a free in-home demo and experience the possibilities yourself today.

View the many features of our Redman Motorized Wheelchairs

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Redman Power Chair’s Reclining Wheelchair Capabilities

With many options out there in reclining wheelchair manufacturers you will need to understand and decide how a reclining wheelchair works to best suit your medical needs. One specific type of wheelchair that is recommended for patients is the reclinable wheelchair. This type of wheelchair allows you to move the backrest through a wider angle of options into a position that is comfortable for the user.

In addition, reclining wheelchairs may also be the best solution if you suffer from medical conditions such as: hight blood pressure, heart malfunction, hip contracture, and more. Through the rage of motion it’s not uncommon for medical patience to experience improvements in the aforementioned medical conditions above as a reclining wheelchair helps to increase the total range of motion that otherwise may not be possible.

More Ways That A Reclining Wheelchair Can Help

Reclining wheelchairs can help individuals suffering from specific conditions in many ways.

Pressure Sores – With the built in reclining feature of a Redman Power Chair the users body weight will be more evenly distributed across the chair to prevent and avoid pressure sores. Pressure sores are most common when an individual has become immobile and sits or lays down all day.

Hypotension and Hypertension – The Redman Power Chair helps aid with these two diagnosis by allowing users to adjust their leg and body position. Conventionally, sitting wheelchairs can lead to bouts of hypotension as an individual is immobile for long periods and will experience a decrease in arterial pressure. With a Redman it is easy to adjust for this through the use of controls featured on the chair its self.

Easier Transfers – Transferring a loved one from conventional wheel chair to a bed may be strenuous or impossible. With the Redman Power Chair, you can recline the users chair so that it is parallel with the bed, making transfers to and from much easier.

Comfort in Mind – Sitting for extended periods of time in a chair that doesn’t prioritize comfort can lead to a loss of overall loss in quality of living. Redman Power Chair accommodates it’s users by accounting for this and only uses the best materials for your all day comfort.

Conclusion

Reclining wheelchairs can help individuals suffering from specific conditions in many ways. With the ability to recline at progressive angles, our chairs help decrease energy exerted by individuals who suffer from ongoing medical conditions. In addition to helping with ongoing conditions, reclining wheelchairs offer more flexibility for care providers and family members when it is necessary.

If you’re looking for a free demo of a Redman Power Chair, Contact Us Today!

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Motorized Wheelchair by Redman Power Chairs

Redman Power Chairs is the #1 leading manufacturer for standing power chairs. With over 30 years experience and an invested interest in changing the power chair industry, Redman offers a proprietary patented design that is custom to it’s users specifications. If you’re looking for a motorized wheelchair that offers a complete body positioning system, superior customer service and even FDA Registration, then look no further.

Our new Chief 107-ZRx Motorized Power Wheelchair can stand, recline, tilt, stretch and move like you never thought possible. Call us today at 1-800-727-6684 to request a free demo! Looking For more information on the Chief 107-ZRx?

What Is a Motorized Wheelchair

In short, a Motorized Wheelchair is a chair that propels it’s user in one or many directions through the use of motors . Contrary to a motorized wheelchair is a manually powered wheelchair, motorized wheelchairs are useful for individuals with complications that prevent them from using a traditional wheelchair. In addition to physically limiting disabilities, motorized wheelchairs are used by patients who suffer from cardiovascular fatigue to prevent the heart from overworking its self. Additionally, people who suffer from pressure sores can now be relieved by a standing feature in the Redman power chair.

Most Motorized wheelchairs come in four or six wheel, non folding designs that may partially dismantle for commuting purposes, with an electronic motor. Most motorized wheelchairs come with an onboard charger that can be plugged into a wall outlet to re-charge the battery. In addition to these options, motorized wheelchairs also come with a Controller, Seat, Environmental Considerations and must be built with safety in mind.

How Does a Motorized Wheelchair Work

As mentioned above, motorized wheelchairs work specifically by using a drive train that consists of a front, mid or rear wheel drive system. Through the use of modern mechanics electric power is converted into rotational power and the chair moves its user forward.

In most cases the chair is is propelled by a user who has access to a controller or joystick. While controllers typically allow the controller to move in a field of 360 degrees, a joystick may have additional buttons or tailored sensitivity to access multiple control modes.

With the Redman power chair 107-ZRx we tailor all user needs to the chairs design specifically for the individual. In addition to a controller, Redman Power Chairs also come with the ability to stretch or raise your legs with the touch of a button to help with circulation and many other amenities. Learn more about all the amenities Redman offers in its line of power chairs.

Why Choose Redman Motorized Wheelchairs?

While there are many types of motorized wheelchair’s, nothing beats a Redman! In addition to our outstanding customer services and free demo, here are more reasons to love a Redman Powerchair!

  • Raise and Lower Your Feet Above and Below Your Heart
  • Eliminates Pressure Ulcers by Distributing Weight More Evenly
  • Fully Reclineable Position
  • Naturally Improves Symptoms of Hypotension
  • Easier Wheelchair to Bed Transfers
  • More Comfort
  • Easy Catheterization for Caregivers
  • Unbeatable Customer Service

 

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What Is a Standing Wheelchair for Quadriplegics?

What Is a Standing Wheelchair for Quadriplegics?

A standing wheelchair for Quadriplegics is a motorized chair that is powered by one or two batteries, with the intended purpose of traveling through all ranges of motion from sitting to standing and back to prone, allowing a better posture and the correction of symptoms like high blood pressure, caused by an individuals disability.

Can a paraplegic or quadriplegic stand?

Redman Power Chair Adjustable Motorized Wheelchair

Is this a simple yes or no answer?

A standing feature is an available option on most high level powered wheelchair and both mainstream as well as custom devices are available.

Both the user and wheelchair companies thrive from constant improvements involving technology and mechanics to add to the quality of life, ultimately.

But for the user, this not only begs the question on the dependability of the product but what the body may or may not be capable of.

Medical Contraindications 

When Michael W. first received his Redman Power Chair, it “allowed me to stand up for the first time in 28 years,” he told interviewers. In his years of using a standing powered wheelchair he has traveled to twenty one countries. Michael endures a C5 spinal cord injury and spent twenty four years without standing. Consulting your primary care physician, as well as a physical therapist and  occupational therapist is crucial to receiving accurate medical information about your condition. There are many concerns involved and some include orthostatic blood pressure regulation, spinal surgery and fusions, amputations, knee replacements and many other conditions. These conditions do not necessarily mean standing is not an option for you. Most clinicians (physical therapy as a field in particular) are willing to work with your condition to correct any body positioning that is not fixed. There are benefits to body positioning yourself with the help of instruction from your doctors. Depending on your condition the greatest benefit may be any of the following: increased perfusion throughout your lower extremities especially reaping increased bone density, improved digestion through expanding the torso and allowing better blood flow into vital organs, improved mental health and many more. There are many companies that provide customizable options. Redman power chair is a fully customizable product offering accessories to allow amputees, muscular dystrophy patients (as well as other diagnosis) in need of custom padding to choose from the options that may increase the probability of body positioning for the user. In any case, collecting data for yourself will only benefit you and as Michael adds, “being able to stand up has changed my life in a lot of ways I am no longer at the bottom of the crowd, I am actually- when I stand up, the biggest guy in the room, again.”

Benefits of A Standing Wheelchair

As mentioned previously, most clinicians are more than willing to work with you throughout the process (although this does not apply to some practices). For a custom built standing motorized wheelchair especially there may be an out of pocket cost to you as the user. In this case a relationship with you doctor will be critical in providing documentation for the prescription of your chair and of your needs. The benefits you may reap including  increased perfusion throughout your lower extremities, increased bone density, improved digestion and better blood flow into the vital organs, enhanced respiration, improved mental health, access to spaces in your environment, the opened possibility to returning to a vocation, and the possibility of fewer medications needed.

There are many reasons you may be searching for a product made specifically for you diagnosis and it comes down to minimizing the symptoms you experience. So how do you make the best choice and what to look for?

Specifications of a Standing Wheelchair

Taking the time to measure and apply specifications for a product of interest in your home (specifically bathroom and living quarters) is one of the most overlooked tasks when researching for the correct wheelchair. Measurements to take into account are turn radius, width, length, seat to floor measurement, seat depth, armrest height, backrest height, battery life, maximum speed, weight of the product and the warranty available.

Most common complications include:

-Blood clots

-Pressure sores

-Autonomic Dysreflexia

-Respiratory issues

-Spastic muscles

-Pain

-Secondary injuries

-Loss of bladder or bowel control

If any of these are issues for you the best choice is to choose a standing power chair with recognized codes for positioning and features such as tilt in space, recline, articulating legs, lower back and hip flexor stretch, heel cord stretch in full recline position, custom dimensions, and proper specifications to access your home and environment.

Do Insurance Companies Cover Electric Wheelchairs?

Do Insurance Companies Cover Electric Wheelchairs?

Yes, insurance companies do cover and pay for electric wheelchairs and can be coordinated by the Redman Power Chair in house insurance department through your insurance company to help you obtain a power wheelchair at little or no cost. First, we pre-qualify you by diagnosis, level of mobility and insurance coverage.

Next, your personal Redman insurance representative get your insurance to approve payment and collects payment directly from your insurance provider. Call Redman Power Chair at 1-800-727-6684 #3 to get started.

We Do Not Give Up!

It’s unfortunate but frequent that client’s have medical needs that are not met and provided an inappropriate piece of equipment. You should not give up. If the chair is an appropriate fit for your needs our insurance specialists work not only efficiently but without relent on your behalf.

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Redman Power Chair

1601 S Pantano Rd Suite #107
Tucson, AZ 85710

1-800-727-6684

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